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Let's say I have a star 20x the mass of the sun. At the end of its life, it collapses into a black hole. Now correct me if I am wrong, but as it collapses it rotational speed dramatically increases doesn't it? So does the singularity continue spinning as it forms? Can something spinning so rapidly actually become a singularity or would it become more of a torus?

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  • $\begingroup$ You make an invalid assumption that a collapsing star creates a singularity. It doesn't. The singularity never forms in the eternity of time for any remote observer. $\endgroup$ – safesphere Aug 16 '20 at 3:34
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Spinning black holes are governed by the Kerr metric, and have a ring singularity or "ringularity". A ringularity has a finite radius but no thickness so would not be described as a torus.

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  • $\begingroup$ Would most solar black holes be ringularities? $\endgroup$ – Rick Aug 15 '20 at 19:19
  • $\begingroup$ @rick it is unlikely and perhaps impossible for a real black hole to have exactly zero angular momentum. $\endgroup$ – ProfRob Aug 15 '20 at 20:53

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