0
$\begingroup$

Usually, it is mentioned that the Higgs field IS the origin of mass for known fundamental particles.

If very heavy dark particles are found (heavier or much heavier than the top quark), should it mean that there is OTHER mechanism responsible of the origin of Dark Matter particles, not the Higgs field we do know? After all, Higgs itself can not decay into HEAVIER particles. Or is there a way in which the current Higgs field and mechanism can provide the origin of arbitrarily mass dark matter massive particles?

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ the Higgs particle IS the origin of mass for known fundamental particles No, the Higgs field is. The Higgs particle is not involved. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Aug 12 '20 at 17:42
  • $\begingroup$ Corrected! Thanks! $\endgroup$ – riemannium Aug 12 '20 at 22:01
1
$\begingroup$

If very heavy dark particles are found (heavier or much heavier than the top quark), should it mean that there is OTHER mechanism responsible of the origin of Dark Matter particles, not the Higgs field we do know?

Let us be clear: the Higgs mechanism involves the Higgs field, in giving mass after electroweak breaking. The Higgs particle (or particles depending on the theory assumed) is a consequence of the existence of the Higgs field, not the reason. This is true for the standard model and any extension theories. Creation operators on the Higgs field according to quantum field theory, will create a Higgs , analogous to creation operators on the electron field create an electron.

Now there are many theories of the origin of dark matter . Higgs mechanism is relevant to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPS), and for those the mass will be given at electroweak symmetry breaking. For all the other hypotheses given in the link how mass is defined will depend on the context theories.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.