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I watched Interstellar and I got really confused around different time thing. How can it be possible at all that time is different at different places in the universe?

Please explain.

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  • $\begingroup$ Location of varying gravity, I guess? $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Aug 9, 2020 at 18:32
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    $\begingroup$ Wikipedia has an article on gravitational time dilation. It will make more sense if you start by trying to understand time dilation in general, and Einstein’s theories of relativity that did away with the old Newtonian concept of absolute time. $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Aug 9, 2020 at 18:52
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    $\begingroup$ You can also search for “time dilation” using the search box on this site. I got more than 4000 results. $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Aug 9, 2020 at 18:56

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It follows from the theory of relativity that time is not the same everywhere. Basically, time moves slowly with an increase in gravity and an increase in speed as well. Thus, you would age slowly if you are close to a black hole or traveling at speeds close to the speed of light.

I would suggest you to go through the following blogs to understand this properly.

  1. Overall Idea
  2. Theory of Relativity
  3. Time Dilation
  4. Gravitational Time Dilation
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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks James 😊 $\endgroup$ Aug 10, 2020 at 6:00
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An outside observer sees events (such as the vibrations of a light source) occurring more slowly deep in a strong gravitational field. We may see the the stars orbiting the dense center of the galaxy as going slower than expected.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks will check on Google 😊 $\endgroup$ Aug 10, 2020 at 6:03
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It all has to do with gravity. The stronger the gravity the slower the time. According to this article the earths surface is 2 1/2 years older than the earths core because of a difference in gravity.

https://www.sciencealert.com/earth-s-core-is-2-5-years-younger-than-its-crust-thanks-to-the-curvature-of-space-time

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