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I'm working with a pressure vessel that is cooled to a reasonably cool temperature. Since it is cooled at pressure when the air exits the pressurized system the gas expands and thus cools a great deal more according to the gas laws.

I was wondering if this (extremely) cold air can be bubbled up through water to cool the water.

Is this possible?

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    $\begingroup$ It is possible, but a heat exchanger would likely be a better bet. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Jul 21 '20 at 18:45
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, but consider that the water most likely will absorb some of the gas. That either might or might not be a problem depending on what kind of gas you are talking about and, on what you plan to do with the chilled water. Contrariwise, the bubbles will pick up some water vapor. That either might or might not be a problem depending on what you intend to do with the gas. $\endgroup$ – Solomon Slow Jul 21 '20 at 19:24
  • $\begingroup$ @SolomonSlow - indeed, I'm more used to using heated (well, warmed) gas (e.g. nitrogen) to pick up vapor from the liquid (metalorganic precursor) to send into a reaction chamber. Much easier to flow lots of cold water than handled lots of cold gas. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Jul 21 '20 at 20:45

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