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I was solving a numerical example(image1) of 'Griffiths book of electrodynamics' enter image description here

And in this solution it is given that if there is a changing magnetic field is there there would be induce induce electric field associated with it. So now I take a example something like this (image2)enter image description here

So as Griffiths example suggest that for this problem (2nd image) there should be an induce electric field around the loop but Problem - if 1.I placed a charge at position 'c' which is in between a and b(image2) ,will charge experience any force? 2.what will be potential difference between point a and b 3.is free electron of conducting loop moves in the direction of induced electric field and make one end positive and other negative?

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  • $\begingroup$ In the original problem the B field is given as pointing up. On the sketch it should be represented by dots and not crosses. $\endgroup$
    – R.W. Bird
    Jul 13, 2020 at 14:50
  • $\begingroup$ No that was completely new question, that I asked about, not related to 1st image $\endgroup$
    – user215805
    Jul 13, 2020 at 14:56

2 Answers 2

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The induced E field will push electrons counterclockwise around the loop leaving point, a, positive and making point, b, negative. The potential drop across the gap will be equal to the induced emf.

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  • $\begingroup$ But, there is no flux change through loop then why emf is induced? $\endgroup$
    – user215805
    Jul 13, 2020 at 16:07
  • $\begingroup$ The problem states that B is changing with time. The induced E field does not require a closed conductive loop. $\endgroup$
    – R.W. Bird
    Jul 14, 2020 at 12:38
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  1. Yes it will experience a force due to the induced electric field.

  2. The potential difference is equal to the product of the induced electric field and the arc length ab.

  3. The free electrons will make one end positive and one end negative such that the electric field due to rearranged charges exactly cancels the induced electric field.

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