4
$\begingroup$

note that it's taught that in standard model particles that mediated weak interaction force are gauge bosons: vector particles, spin 1, take one charge.

I'm wondering how to prove these properties in experiment?

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

Gauge bosons are part of the quantum mechanical models built in order to fit an enormous amount of data gathered with particle physics experiments. In that sense they have been measured in experiments by that data since the establishment as mainstream of the standard model of physics. All the particles in the table are considered measured, because with out their definite existence in the behavior of the data, the model would be falsified. All new experiments are mainly validating the model.

Here is the measurement of the Z particle, identified with the electroweak broken symmetry gauge boson.

e+e-

There are many resonances in the $e^+e^-$ crossection, but only the Z fits the model predictions.

In the same way, in the interactions many resonances have been measured, but only $W^+$ and $^-W$ fit the model predictions.

I'm wondering how to prove these properties in experiment?

The properties are proven because the observed resonances, together with all the other discovered, fit the predictions of the standard model.

$\endgroup$
6
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! So the main evidence is the resonances?just curious that how could one prove that one particle is vector field? $\endgroup$
    – feng lin
    Jul 6 '20 at 10:26
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The interactions anddecays that are allowed with the other particles because of the conservation of angular momentum the spin can be measured. The recent, new "resonance" is defined as the sought higgs, and here is how they check the spin inspirehep.net/literature/1653390 . the W and Z were found long ago $\endgroup$
    – anna v
    Jul 6 '20 at 10:30
  • $\begingroup$ thanks, so could isospin be measured? if it couldn't, how could we check the isospin in the standard model? $\endgroup$
    – feng lin
    Jul 6 '20 at 10:37
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ isospin is measured by fining approximately same mass different charge particles, as proton and neutron for example, fit isospin 1/2. look up in wikipedia the decuplet and octed model. those are observations/measurements $\endgroup$
    – anna v
    Jul 6 '20 at 10:49
  • $\begingroup$ I did a research on the plot, horizontal axis tells the energy used for smashing particles and vert axis tells the chances of getting different reactions, how do machine measures the chances of Z or W+ would pop out? Do you mean the chances are based on predictions from standard models so someone painstakingly put in the label next to those suspicious excitations in the plot? $\endgroup$
    – user6760
    Jul 6 '20 at 11:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.