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I've made an experiment with resonance frequency of a LC circuit. One part was to place a metal (I think iron) in the middle of the induktivity of LC circuit. I measured a higher resonance frequncy as without the metal. How is this possible? I thought cause of the permeability of the metal the induktivity would increase and frequency would decrease. In fact its reversed.

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  • $\begingroup$ Theoretically, if everything is working properly, it should be as you described. Without being able to work with the exact setup, I find it hard to say what could be the issue - one thought I have is that your metal piece may be shorting out the inductor if insulation is not done properly - that could be something to check. $\endgroup$ – Tom Feng Jul 1 at 20:33
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You don't provide much data, so I can only guess. For example, it seems you are not sure about the material of the metal core, so it could be nonmagnetic. Then the resonance frequency can decrease because of losses in the core due to eddy currents.

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