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Most answers and articles I've read so far try to give real world examples such as a spring or a pendulum. However, I'm trying to understand the core difference between the two terms in the most fundamental context.

Do we need the term vibration if we can treat a point in space as if it oscillates but in much shorter distances? (Here the phrase "much shorter" sounds too vague which should be unacceptable in physics.) Or does the term vibration imply that the concept of time and a relative range restriction (to a particular movement we're dealing with) together is involved with the movement?

It definitely seems possible to pass my undergraduate exams without going into this much detail, but I feel like there's a gap in my understanding and I would be very glad if you could give me a more complete picture.

Thank you.

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Lets look at the words:

Vibration is a mechanical phenomenon whereby oscillations occur about an equilibrium point. The word comes from Latin vibrationem ("shaking, brandishing"). The oscillations may be periodic, such as the motion of a pendulum—or random, such as the movement of a tire on a gravel road.

and

Oscillation is the repetitive variation, typically in time, of some measure about a central value (often a point of equilibrium) or between two or more different states. The term vibration is precisely used to describe mechanical oscillation. Familiar examples of oscillation include a swinging pendulum and alternating current.

So vibration is an oscilation in a specific medium, a mechanical phenomenon, an example of an oscillation.

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