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How is the lift force is generated on a rocket? I've tried to find answer online but all efforts were in vain.

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The lift force is due to the mechanical force, which is generated by the reaction of accelerating a mass of gas by the engine, as explained by Newton's third law of motion. A gas or working fluid is accelerated to the rear and the engine and rocket are accelerated in the opposite direction. For more details, see https://www.grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/airplane/rockth.html

Actually my query isn't about the thrust. My query is about the Lift force which is an aerodynamic force that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the rocket. The lift force is drawn out here : grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/rocket/rktaero.html –

OK I see. I wasn't aware that the term "lift force" referred to forces perpendicular to the vertical motion of the rocket, i.e., a sideways force.

However, the terminology seems a bit at odds with the use of the term "lift off" as used during a launch countdown- 3, 2, 1, 0 ..."lift off"! Odd that the term "lift force" actually means going sideways and not vertically up, yet the term "lift off" refers to vertical motion as in a count down due to unbalanced vertical forces as described in the following article: https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/389-lift-off

One would logically think the term "lift force" would refer to the force associated with "lift off". But apparently not. Interesting...

Hope this helps.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think you're describing the thrust $\endgroup$ – Sathvik Swaminathan May 21 at 19:01
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, I thought that's what the OP was asking. Thrust is the force responsible for lifting the rocket (separating it from the surface of the earth). $\endgroup$ – Bob D May 21 at 19:09
  • $\begingroup$ Actually my query isn't about the thrust. My query is about the Lift force which is an aerodynamic force that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the rocket. The lift force is drawn out here : grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/rocket/rktaero.html $\endgroup$ – Sathvik Swaminathan May 21 at 19:13
  • $\begingroup$ Ah, I see now. I wasn't familiar with the difference. But is looks like the link you provided explains the lift force. So what then is your specific question about the lift force that's not explained in the link.? $\endgroup$ – Bob D May 21 at 19:20

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