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I’ve been learning the concepts of static equilibrium and the book I’m using is providing examples of objects that are unstable when their center of gravity is outside the area of support. For example, the higher the center of gravity of a car is, the easier it is overturned over a banked road. How to prove that torque is not zero when center of gravity of a body lies outside the body’s area of support (i.e. outside the area enclosed by lines passing through the wheels that parallel vertically to the car’s body)?

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The torque produced by a selected force relative to a selected point is only zero if the line of action of the force passes through the point.

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