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I am very confused about the following:

I would consider a perfect screw to have low entropy. Its surface is near frictionless because the arrangement of molecules is just perfectly ordered and constructed.

This screw can be used to convert one type of energy into another without losing a lot to heat energy. The lower entropy causes energy conversions to be more perfect, from one form to other form instead of creating a lot of new energy forms.

However, it took a great amount of energy to create this perfect screw. The same can be said about a perfect sail, a perfect gear wheel..

One would almost say there is something being conserved with the energy needed to create order in the disordered universe, and the highly efficient energy conversion machines created from these objects.

Does this relationship have a name? And is it even a true statement, that a lot of energy is needed to create these low entropy objects? Sometimes I hear creating low entropy things is easy: just lower the temperature. But I don’t see how that’s possible without taking energy from somewhere else to tame all the random brownian motions into something that is statistically behaving in a certain way with a minimum of variation.

And, is there a relationship between minimal entropy and maximum conversion of energy forms?

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Usually because that is what the second law of thermodynamics states. Entropy must always increase. Since things that create low entropy violate this law this means that it took a lot of energy to make these low entropy objects. Of course entropy can drop as long as the entropy of the universe keeps on increasing. Well I am not too sure but minimal entropy means you can not really convert energy from one form to another. There has to be a change of entropy. It is not to just have low entropy. That low entropy must then start increasing to high entropy for conversion of energy forms to occur. That is because if everywhere entropy is low then that low entropy will be the new high entropy and somewhere there will be a lower entropy.

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