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The situation is as follow:

When used to measure body temperature, my infrared thermometer will always measure an abnormal high temperature in ONE certain room (40/41 degree celcius), but it will always measure a normal temperature outside of that room (36/37 degree celcius). This is tried on multiple different persons with different room temperature, with multiple distances of measurement on the forehead.

I own two infrared thermometer of the same brand and model (JPD-FR202). And both would only behave abnormally in that single room. The room has an air conditioner and a computer. When tested, both the air-con and pc are turned off.

Is there any wave or radiation that would affect the accuracy of an infrared thermometer? Or are there any other scientific phenomenons that I should look into? Or would it be more reasonable to assume that I own two thermometers of a faulty patch?

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    $\begingroup$ Maybe try to do a thermoimage of the room... $\endgroup$ – user12986714 May 3 at 15:52
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Is there any wave or radiation that would affect the accuracy of an infrared thermometer?

To potentially state the obvious, infrared radiation would do that. Have you checked your lights in that room? LEDs and incandescent bulbs give off an enormous amount of IR radiation, which could cause your thermometer to read high.

To test this, you could try measuring temperatures with the lights off. Your thermometer doesn't care - ostensibly it's just reading the IR which is being radiated by the target, and works just as well in the dark - but it would remove any contribution coming from ambient IR due to the lights in the room.

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you very much for your reply. I have tried turning off light, and all my other electronic devices in the room, including my wifi in the next room, the situation still occurs. That's why I am very confused. $\endgroup$ – Alexander1023 May 3 at 16:27
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    $\begingroup$ I personally suspect that my walls are storing up heat during daytime, and then releasing the heat as infrared radiation. Do you think this is a possibility? $\endgroup$ – Alexander1023 May 3 at 16:32
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    $\begingroup$ You may have a hot water pipe in one wall of the affected room. $\endgroup$ – David White Sep 18 at 19:09
  • $\begingroup$ The walls are unlikely to be the cause unless they are also above normal body temperature. $\endgroup$ – Penguino Oct 20 at 7:10

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