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In uniform circular motion, for my lab, I used the formula $𝐹_𝑐=4\pi^2 m r \times$(𝑓2) to find the experimental centripetal force

and I use $F_{cp}= 4\pi^2mr$ to find the theoretical value of $F_c$. I ended up with the same value of $F_c$.

I concluded that frequency does not affect that much the centripetal force but I do not have enough arguments. can I get help on this please?

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    $\begingroup$ Please use Latex to format your formulas. Also, what kind of system are you looking at and what is $f_2$? What is your exact question? With the information given it's almost impossible to give an answer. $\endgroup$
    – Sito
    Apr 30, 2020 at 23:28
  • $\begingroup$ the theoretical formula does not generally looks like that; it is $F=m\omega^2r$... And your "experimental" centripetal force formula is just a duplicate of the theoretical one, as $2\pi f$ is just $\omega$. $\endgroup$ May 1, 2020 at 1:18
  • $\begingroup$ What is (f2)? Also, the unit of mass x length is not force (your 2nd equation). Are there terms missing in your question? $\endgroup$
    – Bill N
    May 1, 2020 at 1:25
  • $\begingroup$ $F_{cp}= 4\pi^2mr$ try to apply basic dimensional analysis and you should see some issues. $\endgroup$ May 1, 2020 at 3:16

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The centripetal force acting on a body of mass $m$ in uniform circular motion located at a distance $r$ from the axis of rotation is: $$F_{c} = m\omega^2 r = m(2\pi f)^2 r = 4\pi^2 f^2 m r$$

Here, $\omega$ is the angular frequency of rotation and $f$ is the number of rotations per second.

The only way you arrived at your conclusion is because $f=1$. Coming to such a conclusion that the frequency does not affect the centripetal force that much is highly erroneous as it is apparent from the relation that the centripetal force varies as frequency squared.

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