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I ‘m trying to make a transformer and I understand the basic concept of Lenz’s law, and I understand how the ratios work. I get that if you have a transformer with 100 turns on the primary and 10 on the secondary, given 110VAC 10A in you’ll get ~ 11VAC 100A out because $ P_p = I_p V_p = I_s V_s = P_s $ I get that it depends on the winding ratio, in this case 10:1 What I don't get is what happens if you make it 100,000 turns on the primary and 10,000 on the secondary, or 10 on the primary and one on the secondary. What does it matter? Does it have something to do with power draw? Please don’t mark this as belonging on electrical engineering stack exchange it’s supposed to be a physics problem.

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I'm not expert on practical transformer design, but I believe the number of turns on the coils should theoretically have no effect on the voltages of an ideal (lossless) transformer. The secondary voltage should still depend on the the turns ratio.

But you are correct that it should seem to matter for power draw. The fewer the number of turns the lower the ohmic resistance of the coils and the greater the amount of current that can be delivered to the primary winding and to the load in the secondary circuit for given voltages. However, once again, the ratio of the secondary to primary current should still be the same.

Keep in mind the above applies to an ideal transformer. Like I said I'm no expert on transformer design, but there may be other issues related to the number of turns and/or gauge of the coils that effect real transformer performance, such as the effect of the wire size and number of turns needed to avoid magnetic saturation of the coil.

Hope this helps.

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