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Suppose I would like to heat up a quantity of water (at maximum 60 degrees) using a hot aluminium plate similar to a bowl. I observed that bubbles appear on the bottom aluminium surface.

Is there some material, some coatings that I can use in order to avoid bubble formation? Or at least something that could help bubbles to go up and not stay on the bottom?

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At 60 degrees C, those bubbles are most likely dissolved gases coming out of solution. If you have a pressing need to avoid this, you will need to preheat the water to remove these gases before you heat the water on a hot aluminum plate.

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  • $\begingroup$ I tested at 65 degrees C and unfortunately bubbles are still there. $\endgroup$ – Daniele Apr 23 at 15:17
  • $\begingroup$ You want to heat the water up to a temperature somewhat higher than 60 degrees (e.g., 90-95 deg C), then transfer to a container with a lid on it to let it cool down. The container should contain as little air as possible (make it full if you can) so air does not diffuse back into the water as it cools. Once the water cools, try your experiment again, but don't expose the deaerated water to air any longer than necessary. $\endgroup$ – David White Apr 25 at 17:44
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The temperature will be much higher than 60 degrees at the aluminium interface, which will contribute to dissolved gasses froming bubbles attached to surface roughness. Perhaps a perfectly polished aluminium surface and slower heating will also help. You may also consider a microwave oven. Leave out metal bowl in this case.

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  • $\begingroup$ At the moment the surface is black anodized. It won't help me right? $\endgroup$ – Daniele Apr 23 at 15:18

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