0
$\begingroup$

I've been wondering if electrons and protons could switch place such as constituent of an atom nuclei or that a proton "orbits" an electron instead ("inverted" hydrogen), are there forces on the quark level that prohibits such situations?

I do know charges do not affect the role because antimatter wouldn't exist.

| cite | improve this question | | | | |
$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

First of all the strong residentual interaction which binds the neutrons and the protons in the core is unbelievably strong. Electrons don't feel the strong interaction(nor the strong residentual interaction) -> they would all be repulsed from each other and not form a 'nucleus'.

The closest thing you describe is a nucleus made of antiprotons and antineutrons( negatively charged ) surrounded by a cloud of protons but this would be extremely dangerous to play with.

| cite | improve this answer | | | | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ It probably wouldn't last for more than a few picoseconds, either. $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Mar 31 at 0:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.