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Do we need to insert signs of charges in coulomb's law to find the Forces between two charges ?

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't understand this question. Are you trying to compute the magnitude of the force or its direction? What do you mean by "inserting" the sign of the charge? Do you think the standard version of Coulomb's law does not include the signs? Why? $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Mar 30 at 15:34
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Yes.

Force is a vector quantity which means it is characterized by both magnitude and direction. You don't need to know the signs of the charges to determine the magnitude of the force, but you do need to know them to determine the direction of the force (repulsive or attractive).

Hope this helps.

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No we don't but if we want to find if the force is repulsive or attractive then we must take into account the type of the charges.

And negative and positive charge are just conventional we use them to understand better the 2 types of electric charges and to define several helpful quantities ( potential or potential energy).

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