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I came across a question where it said a electrons rotates in a circular path with a angular velocity in the presence of a perpendicular varying magnetic field.

It was asked what is the change in the magnetic moment of the electron.

The solution equated the change in magnetic moment to (constant of proportionality)(change in angular momentum)*. I do not understand the concept behind this. How are the both related?

I was viewing the discussion at Why are the magnetic moment and the angular moment related? but it doesn't answer to the question precisely. Please include some examples if possible.

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Circular currents, such as electron rotating around a nucleus, create magnetic moment. Thus, the magnetic nature of the orbital angular momentum is rather transparent. It becomes less obvious when talking about spin... and even less obvious when talking about spin of a neutral particle (such as a neutron). So the existence of magnetic moment is just postulated for them.

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  • $\begingroup$ So is there no physical significance of magnetic moment? $\endgroup$ – Gourabo Mar 30 at 9:20
  • $\begingroup$ @Gourabo Not sure what you mean: it interacts with magnetic field and other magnetic moments - this is the significance. On the other hand, orbital magnetic moment is a purely mechanical concept, which is not very useful in QM. $\endgroup$ – Vadim Mar 30 at 9:23

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