1
$\begingroup$

When our sun finally ceases to exist as a red giant, 7 billion years from now, the outer layer of the star will get blown off in huge clouds of gas and dust known as planetary nebulae, leaving behind a very dense core, that cools down to form a white dwarf (approx.. 6000kms in radius). Since the sun no longer exists to exert its gravitational pull, I wonder what would be Jupiter's new orbit in the solar system?

$\endgroup$
15
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Please don't cross-post questions. astronomy.stackexchange.com/q/35594/16685 $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 25, 2020 at 16:45
  • $\begingroup$ Oh, please let me no if its not legal . It's me only who has posted the question on both the sites since it has better chance being answered. I thought cross postings others question is wrong, but this is my own question. $\endgroup$ Mar 25, 2020 at 17:34
  • $\begingroup$ The site rule is that "homework" type questions (which include self-study, not just school) should show some prior research and show some effort to find the answer yourself. You're not really doing that at the moment, so can you edit your question to show what you have tried or what point in your research you are being held up ? $\endgroup$ Mar 25, 2020 at 20:03
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @user12986714 I dint get you, please specify ! How is the total mass of the star same when it sheds 40 to 50% of its mass that form the nebula. $\endgroup$ May 3, 2020 at 6:40
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @user12986714 That premise isn't true, though. Red giants don't shed matter in a perfectly spherically symmetric fashion, so the gravitational field does change. Also, the orbits of other planets will be perturbed when the inner planets are engulfed by the Sun. $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    May 9, 2020 at 11:44

2 Answers 2

0
$\begingroup$

A Study to Show : Jupiter : Our Next Star

My 11th grade research paper 2018

Final Answer under - Jupiter’s Orbit during Thermal Pulse 4 , pg32 (New orbit - 11.620 Billion km from the white dwarf)

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Since the sun no longer exists to exert it's gravitational pull

However, the white dwarf exists, hence Jupiter will still be in orbit around the sun in it's white dwarf phase, unless it got absorbed in the red giant phase or blown away when the outer layer is blown away. As such orbits are always elliptical, Jupiters orbit will still be elliptical.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Right!! Please do go through my paper:) $\endgroup$ Mar 31, 2021 at 5:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.