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Is the ionization of solid material only theoretical or can it also be done in an expiriment? If yes then how?

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  • $\begingroup$ What are you talking about? When you ionize solid material, you sublimate it and its no longer solid. $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 13, 2020 at 1:59
  • $\begingroup$ @AtmosphericPrisonEscape I don't really think I understand how ionizing a solid material makes it get sublimized. $\endgroup$
    – 808kalli
    Commented Mar 13, 2020 at 5:58
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    $\begingroup$ Based on that comment, I think what I mean by ionization might be different of what you think of as ionization. For me, when you ionize single atoms that belong to a solid body, you give them enough energy to escape said body by overcoming the surface potential. After this process is finished you end up with 1 atom and a solid body that just lost an atom. If you repeat this process for several more atoms, you effectively sublimate it, and the resulting gas is a plasma. $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 13, 2020 at 15:00
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    $\begingroup$ @AtmosphericPrisonEscape so you are suggesting that by giving the energy needed to ionize a material you end up destroying it? What if the energy is just enough for the the atoms to lose let's say 2 electrons of their outer shell. I belive the energy required to achieve that is much smaller that what you are imagining. $\endgroup$
    – 808kalli
    Commented Mar 13, 2020 at 15:06

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Sure it can be done, and has been done. All that's needed is plenty of heat. A "siimple" way to do it is to hit a tiny piece of solid material with a powerful laser pulse, as id done in laser-driven nuclear fusion experiments.

When a candle flame (or any other flame) burns, it is temporarily converting wax (or whatever is burning) to a vapor and then to a plasma.

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  • $\begingroup$ And what if the material is sensitive to temperatures above 25 Celsius? $\endgroup$
    – 808kalli
    Commented Mar 12, 2020 at 20:23
  • $\begingroup$ That seems like a really off-the-wall question. What do you really want to know? $\endgroup$
    – S. McGrew
    Commented Mar 12, 2020 at 21:55
  • $\begingroup$ I want to know if there is any other possible method of ionizing a solid material apart from the laser pulse that you described. I'm sorry for any misunderstandings. $\endgroup$
    – 808kalli
    Commented Mar 12, 2020 at 22:13
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This looks more like a question for the chemistry community. But Ionization is just the separation of a solid to its ions. Like Common salt NaCl has ions Na+ and Cl-. If u put any ionic solid into water, it will ionize(even in some polar covalent compounds). It's done in in everyday cooking.

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