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In an element when the number of neutrons differs than that of protons, it is called an isotope. An ion is formed when an atom gains a net charge due to loss or gain of an electron.

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    $\begingroup$ Re: The title of your post. Why would you not think so? $\endgroup$ – Bob D Mar 7 '20 at 18:07
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    $\begingroup$ That's not what isotope means - see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotope $\endgroup$ – J. Murray Mar 7 '20 at 19:35
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    $\begingroup$ All atoms are an isotope. All can be ionized. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Mar 7 '20 at 21:33
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Different isotopes are different versions of an element with the same number of protons but a variable number of neutrons. An ion is an atom that has had electrons added or removed to give an overall electric charge. It is therefore obvious that any isotope of an element can be ionised, as the number of neutrons has no effect on the electronic structure of the atom.

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    $\begingroup$ The number of neutrons has almost no effect on the electronic structure of an atom. $\endgroup$ – Buzz Mar 8 '20 at 1:32
  • $\begingroup$ @Buzz It slightly changes the energy levels but not the number of electrons in each, right? $\endgroup$ – bemjanim Mar 8 '20 at 6:57
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, that is correct. $\endgroup$ – Buzz Mar 8 '20 at 23:02
  • $\begingroup$ @Buzz thank you $\endgroup$ – bemjanim Mar 9 '20 at 7:13

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