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I'm going to ask* about what should be the effect/interaction, if any, when a gamma-ray burst crashes or hits against the magnetic bubbles at Solar System's edge. These magnetic bubbles are explained in [1] from YouTube. I add also as reference this Wikipedia Gamma-ray burst.

Question. Is it possible to say anything about the interaction, the physics, of an impact of a great gamma-ray burst against/going through the magnetic bubbles of a solar system similar than ours? And, additionally, as a secondary question, what happens if the gamma-ray burst does not collide/impact, but passes near the magnetic bubbles, let's say tangentially? Many thanks.

I hope that it is possible say something about it (I evoke what work can be done to elucidate something about my questions). If you know references about what should to be the effect of the expected phenomenom or physics after a collisions of a gamma-ray burst and this kind magnetic bubbles of planetary systems similar than ours, feel free to refer it and I try to search and read it from the literature.

References:

[1] NASA |Voyager Finds Magnetic Bubbles at Solar System's Edge, from the official channel NASA Goddard of YouTube (June, 9th 2011).

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  • $\begingroup$ *In past years I've asked it and delete a similar post using a different account (now deleted). $\endgroup$ – user250478 Mar 1 '20 at 19:04
  • $\begingroup$ I'm waiting feedback in comments or answers from the users of this community, many thanks. Please if you think that my question is interesting feel free to tell it to your colleagues. On the other hand I'm sorry about my bad English (this is the why I've added some redundant words). Many thanks again. $\endgroup$ – user250478 Mar 13 '20 at 17:54
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not completly sure what you would like to know, but this post might give some answers. (One of the answers say: 'So yes, electromagnetic waves are in fact affected by magnetic fields, but it is a very weak effect that only becomes manifest in the presence of extremely strong magnetic fields.') I would say that probably there is no interaction. (Maximum a few simple scattering on the particles inside the bubbles.) (The magnetic field is weak, and the density of the particles is low.) $\endgroup$ – fanyul Aug 27 '20 at 17:38
  • $\begingroup$ @fanyul I'm not a scientist. I've persuaded myself in past (just as belief without scientific support that I can to show) that a special region similar than I described in Hypothesis from Meta post with identificator 12909 and title Asking if the following post could be suitable for the main site Physics Stack Exchange could exist at the edge of our solar system. I don't want to insist in it because I'm sure that the users of this site and moderators were generous, but I believe that it is the solution to my previous question. I offer a bounty to know a suitable answer for my Question. $\endgroup$ – user250478 Aug 27 '20 at 21:00
  • $\begingroup$ I do not have much more to say, my goal thus is to promote with a bounty my question to get an answer from professors or professionals who can to elucidate a suitable answer for my Question and accept it as soon as possible, many thanks @fanyul for your attention and the attention of users of this site. $\endgroup$ – user250478 Aug 27 '20 at 21:05
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First, be careful with popular science or press release reports and their terminology. Second, gamma-rays are at such high frequencies (i.e., orders of magnitude above the plasma frequency), they do not care about the low density plasma or it's magnetic field at the edge of the heliosphere. I do not know what the cross-sections are, off hand, between gamma-rays and thermal electrons or protons, but I can't imagine they are large enough for anything statistically meaningful to happen. That is, a few interactions may occur and may cause a few particles to gain energy (or some other particle production but I'm not a particle physicist so I defer to the experts on that) but only a few particles.

The point is that one could observe the gamma-rays and one could observe the particles, but I very much doubt anything interesting would occur.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much for your answer. $\endgroup$ – user250478 Sep 1 '20 at 15:37
  • $\begingroup$ I was inspired in a talk Gravedad y Mecánica Cuántica (César Gómez), in Spanish by César Gómez from the official channel of YouTube Instituto de Física Teórica IFT. At the seconds $37:30$ to $38:15$ he explains a theoretical resource from what I tried to evoke/speculate it as Hypothesis in my Meta post with identificator 12909, thus my interpretation is $\approx$ a physical realization of my interpretation of his words: that I think that a region as is postulated in my Meta post there exists and that its creation was a consequence of some violent event at the edge of our solar system $\endgroup$ – user250478 Sep 1 '20 at 15:55
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The magnetic bubbles don't have any measurable effects on gamma-ray bursts. (Niether when they go through, nor when pass near.) In order to be able to (maybe) measure any interaction between the gamma-rays and the magnetic field of the bubbles, there should be orders of magnitudes stronger fields in the bubbles. (As discussed in this post.) Another possible interaction is the scattering of the gamma-rays on the particles (protons and electrons) inside the bubbles. (Mostly Compton-scattering on electrons, and a little pair production.) But the density of the bubbles is so low (considering the size of this region) that the effect is unmeasurable again (although still larger than the effect of the magnetic field).

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much for your answer. $\endgroup$ – user250478 Aug 30 '20 at 16:10

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