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I know that a magnetic field is a result of moving charges (general relativity) but why and how would this positive charge (moving negative charge/electron -> less negative charge -> positive charge) cause a ferromagnetic object to be attracted. A magnetic field caused by a movement of negative charge should be positive because of relativity and so should the ferromagnetic object as it has electrons moving around. Shouldn't they repel?

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to SE Physics. Good questions try to provide accurate context to help people to give good answers. Some previous search could be helpful. Mentioning general relativity in connection with magnetism, implications like that in parenthesis, and mentioning a positive magnetic field are pieces of information difficult to understand, if not wrong. I suggest you could try to improve the formulation of your question. $\endgroup$
    – GiorgioP
    Feb 28 '20 at 13:03
  • $\begingroup$ As you suspected the magnetic field induced by moving charges do repel, this phenomenon is called diamagnetism, all materials show that behavior but that is not ferromagnetism. Ferromagnetism is a quantum mechanical phenomenon and is not caused by moving charges instead it is the result of collective behavior of electrons and their spins. $\endgroup$
    – hyportnex
    Feb 28 '20 at 13:04
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The magnetic field in the magnet causes the domain of ferrous material to align, causing it to become a magnet temporarily. The magnetic fields of both objects interact and create a force.

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