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I'm reading an article (The fluid mechanics of bubbly drinks by Roberto Zenit), I have a question about it (the part of which is added as a picture) part of the article

In the article they say that the gas cavity will immediately adopt to the saturation concentration, and then they say that there will be a flux towards the gas gavity (which looks contradictory to me since the concentration of the gas in the cavity is the saturation concentration and thus the flux should be in the opposite side?) Should it be instaid of the gas cavity will adopt to the saturation concentration: the fluid around the cavity will adopt to the saturation concentration and thus there will be a flux towards the cavity?

Or am I completely wrong?

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  • $\begingroup$ "the gas cavity will immediately adopt to the saturation concentration"- this means that the cavity will immediately adopt(absorb) molecules from the fluid surrounding the cavity, so that in the layers surrounding the cavity the concentration of dissolved gas will drop to equilibrium saturation concentration at a given reduced pressure and a diffusion flow to the cavity will arise due to the difference in concentrations, nothing contradictory $\endgroup$ – Aleksey Druggist Feb 15 at 9:22
  • $\begingroup$ @AlekseyDruggist if I understand you good, the concentration of gas is bigger in the cavity than in de layers surrounding the cavity? Wouldn't it be more logicaly that there is than a mass flux from the cavity (with lots of gas) to the surrounding layers (less gas)? $\endgroup$ – Mari3 Feb 15 at 9:35
  • $\begingroup$ or is it like this, in the cavity there comes more gas due to Henry's law, but not more than in the layers surrounding the cavity? $\endgroup$ – Mari3 Feb 15 at 9:42
  • $\begingroup$ the surface of a cavity is a sink for gas atoms dissolved in a liquid. We consider the diffusion of only atoms dissolved in a liquid; gas in a cavity is not dissolved $\endgroup$ – Aleksey Druggist Feb 15 at 9:53
  • $\begingroup$ But how can there then be diffusion to the gas cavity? Is it possible to say in a simple way what happens? $\endgroup$ – Mari3 Feb 15 at 9:56

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