-1
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

Hi there,

I am confused about why the vector diagram in the answers for the question above is drawn as such.

I thought it would be drawn like this:

enter image description here

My vector diagram gives a resultant vector which is 25.56 degrees north east, but the answer at the top gives 63.4 degrees north east.

Which is correct? How do you know which vector to draw first if they are happening simultaneously,

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Personally I'd prefer the angle convention you chose, which is 25.6° NE FROM THE NORTH, rather than the answer of 63.4° NE FROM THE EAST. As MayMorPau22 said, it's a matter of convention in regards to what the angle is being measured from. I'm not sure that the mathematical convention of measuring angle from the x-axis can be assumed to be the universal convention when dealing with NESW, where I'd favor the convention of measuring the angle from the north, as you did. $\endgroup$ – electronpusher Feb 14 at 10:19
  • $\begingroup$ I downvoted your post and vote to close the question because it's not about Physics. It's elementary trigonometry. $\endgroup$ – Frobenius Feb 14 at 11:09
-2
$\begingroup$

The question is about forces applied simultaneously to an object which we take to be a point particle or the forces are applied at the same point. That's the only way the question makes sense. We are asked to find the resultant at that point.

Your drawing applies to a situation of displacements.

$\endgroup$
-2
$\begingroup$

It's just a matter of convenion. You're computing the complentary angel, which yields to $\alpha + \beta = 90$. No matter what angle you compute, neither the order of the forces, since your calculus are correct and add a always a diagram to clarify your answer

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.