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The higgs particle or field is what gives mass to everything. It's said that nothing can escape a black hole. If that is true how can the black hole "tell" its mass as even the higgs would not be able to escape? If higgs particles are able to escape, will eventually all matter be converted to higgs particles -- it's the only way out of the black hole?

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    $\begingroup$ I think youv'e misunderstood the Higgs mechanism $\endgroup$ – bemjanim Feb 5 at 17:57
  • $\begingroup$ @bemjanim: Could you help out and provide a reference. It would probably help user3800527. $\endgroup$ – Semoi Feb 5 at 18:05
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    $\begingroup$ Does this answer your question? What gives mass to black hole? $\endgroup$ – Semoi Feb 5 at 18:06
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    $\begingroup$ Every kind of particle gets emitted from a black hole as Hawking radiation to some degree. Higgs particles would be negligible until the very end when the hole is extremely hot. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Feb 5 at 18:13
  • $\begingroup$ The introduction section of the wikipedia page for the Higgs boson provides a good overview of the basics. $\endgroup$ – bemjanim Feb 5 at 21:12
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"The Higgs particle or field is what gives mass to everything." No: not so. Most of the rest mass of any composite system is owing to the energy of its internal interactions.

But I wonder whether your question is really coming from some vague intuition that some sort of particle or influence has to travel from inside the black hole to outside, in order that the gravitational interaction can take place. This intuition is more wrong than right. It can be invoked if one understands quantum field theory well enough, and the distinction between particles and virtual particles or "off-shell" processes. But I would not recommend you do that until you have learned that area of maths. Better to stick to classical physics for your main intuitions about all gravitational phenomena.

The following might help.

The spacetime outside a spherically symmetric mass is the same, for a given mass, no matter what form the mass takes. At locations outside the object there will be no difference for a spherical star or rock or a spherical black hole. If the star were to collapse in a spherically symmetric way, then there would be no change at all outside the region initially occupied by the star, either during the collapse or after it. This helps one to see that the gravitational phenomena at any given place are caused by the shape of spacetime right at that place, not what is going on somewhere else. Meanwhile the shape of spacetime at one place is related to its shape at nearby places, and so on. The shape (i.e. curvature) is set up at any given place through the history of whatever happened at that place. It is not set up by influences propagating from inside a black hole or anything like that.

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  • $\begingroup$ I was more thinking the way Erick van der linden describes space and gravity as an emerging force was thinking maybe higgs is a carrier for this all mass time gravity and space are emerging oh well it's above my knowledge there's no m theory yet. $\endgroup$ – user3800527 Feb 16 at 20:36
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The basic answer to your question is no, a Higgs particle cannot escape from the event horizon of a black hole, just like everything else. Although the underlying Higgs field is a (small, but important) source of mass for leptons, quarks, and the weak bosons ($W^{\pm},Z^0$), this essentially does not affect the discussion of how an actual Higgs boson particle will behave inside a black hole. Putting aside the fact that a Higgs particle will decay rather quickly (even in the black hole background), it will just fall to the center of the black hole, like anything else would.

I suspect a full quantum-gravity calculation will give this same basic answer, since at the heart of this is the fact that the event horizon distinguishes causally separated regions of spacetime, so by Lorentz invariance the particle can't escape.

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