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For a given conductor following ohms law an increase in Voltage results in increase in Current Now consider power transmission through a given piece of conductor (assume certain length and fixed and known resistance R). For constant power transmission V*I= constant So the current at 1000V will be less than the current at 10000V so 10000V is preferable to transmit power to reduce losses I^2R

Now i have these doubts To say that power transmission takes place at 10000 Volts does that mean the potential difference across the conductor is 10000V ??

If so then from ohms law 10000V would make more current to flow than 1000V but that would be counter intuitive

So what is happening here??

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Here is what is happening:

There is a transformer at the source end of the transmission system that simultaneously increases the transmission voltage and reduces the transmission current. Then, at the load end of the transmission line, there is a second transformer that does the reverse. In this way, the current in the long-distance part of the system is minimized, thereby minimizing ohmic losses in those lines.

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  • $\begingroup$ Please refer below sir $\endgroup$ – pallav raj Feb 4 '20 at 3:51
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Please clarify sir and correct me if i am wrong The transmission cable is connected to the secondary windings of the transformer right. So the secondary windings step up the voltage to say 10000V and reduce the current to a low value. This low current is carried by the conductor?? But then the conductor is connected to the secondary windings which ia at 10000V. So the transmission conductor is seeing 10000V across it but the current is not determined by ohms law V=IR rather it merely transfers the low current from the transformer as if it is being fed into it without the conductor acknowledging that it has 10000V connected across it.

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  • $\begingroup$ the 10,000 volt, low current power is carried by the transmission line. Ohm's law then determines the losses created by the entire length of the transmission line. This means that the voltage at the load end of the transmission line will be slightly less than 10,000 volts. $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Feb 4 '20 at 7:01

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