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Is there any limits of power or power to mass (or any other) limits for nuclear bombs?

I found this wiki article: Nuclear weapon yield: Yield limits. Is the information provided is correct? If yes, from where this limits come from?

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The sun and all other stars are in effect thermonuclear bombs. If they get heavier than about 10 times the mas of the sun they eventually blow up as a supernova, so there is a limit to the size but it's a lot larger than anything we will ever build.

In the wikipedia article, the yield limits have to do with deliverability. It's no good having a huge bomb if you can only explode it in the factory where it's made. They're talking about "6 megatons per metric ton" so a 60 megaton bomb would weigh 10 tons. The article gives examples of delivery, with the limit being a 1.3Gt bomb deliverable by an Antonov An-225.

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Nobody really knows. The Tsar Bomba was a 50 megaton explosion, weighing 27,000 kg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsar_Bomba It was scaled down from a 100 megaton design to reduce the fallout created. The blast did damage up to 900 km away, and despite detonating 4200m above surface, caused seismic disturbance greater than 5 on the Richter scale. No one has dared test a larger design -- but much like huge draglines and dumptrucks, no one WANTS to push the design to the upper limits. You can get better results, more reliability, and greater fault tolerance delivering more, smaller bombs. The Tsar Bomba actually sent most of its energy into space, and not along the surface -- which is what you want a bomb to do -- so BIGGER yield may not in fact scale to bigger damage. Speculating about thermonuclear weapons is really all we can do https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermonuclear_weapon because real knowledge remains closely controlled. The Tsar Bomba was speculated to have had multiple tertiary stages. It is unknown how many teritary stages can be chained together. The bomb basically explodes in a spherical fashion. As the radius of the sphere increases, the volume involved cubes. To work, the stage must compress the layer above it to fusion temperature and density and hold it there long enough to create yield.

No one knows the upper engineering limit of success -- because no one has tried and failed to exceed it. It is much like the question "how large an aircraft can be constructed and flown." Unknown.

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