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  1. As per Einstein space is flexible it means it can be curved with mass but I am not able to visualize the relationship between space and time (space-time continuum).

  2. According to Newton Apple falls because earth pulls the apple towards it and it is easy to visualize but As per Einstein Apple remains at that place but time passes so it appears to be falling(how can I visualize the same)?

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    $\begingroup$ Why do you think that the apple “remains at that place” in Einstein’s theory? $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Jan 21, 2020 at 18:18
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    $\begingroup$ I strongly recommend learning about Special Relativity first, before trying to understand General Relativity. SR will teach you why and how space and time are combined into spacetime. Learn how to visualize flat spacetime (Minkowski spacetime) first. $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Jan 21, 2020 at 18:20
  • $\begingroup$ Does this answer your question? How does "curved space" explain gravitational attraction? $\endgroup$ Jan 22, 2020 at 6:40
  • $\begingroup$ My question is not answered with the above link, I want to know how apple fall as per curved space. $\endgroup$ Jan 22, 2020 at 8:16
  • $\begingroup$ Arpan, if you want to reply to John you need to "ping" him like this: @JohnRennie. Otherwise, he won't know about your comment. You automatically get notified by all these comments here because they're attached to your question. $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Jan 22, 2020 at 8:43

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*The answer is simplified by starting small, very small. Imagine you are an atom, the old fashion hydrogen atom with a single electron. You use your circulating electron as a clock, and the clock ticks every time the electron circulates. Easy. But now you begin to speed up, faster and faster (either by acceleration or because you are in greater and greater gravity). As you speed up, the electron circulating around you must make a larger, more elliptic orbit. Since the electron's speed stays the same, your clock must slow down. It takes longer for the electron to orbit. You may not notice a big change until you get very, very fast, near the speed of light. Since the electron orbits at less than the speed of light, it would take longer and longer for the electron to orbit, and your electron clock would slow more and more, and time would slow down for you. In addition all the electrons and atomic material in you (the rest of the atom) would take larger orbits and thus slow down also, so you would not notice anything amiss, as time slowed compare to your original reference time. Think of gravity (acceleration) as adding distance to all the elemental movements in your atomic self (or in an apple), and you can understand the relationship between gravity (acceleration, speed) and time. *

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    $\begingroup$ The problem with the old Bohr model is that it’s wrong. $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Jan 22, 2020 at 3:42
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    $\begingroup$ And thus this answer is wrong. $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Jan 23, 2020 at 21:22
  • $\begingroup$ The Bohr atom is admittedly wrong, or outdated, but the analogy, energy spinning around a point in whatever fashion, correctly demonstrates how time of an orbit (or non orbits in the modern atomic model, changes as matter approaches the speed of light. Thus the electron clock, in whatever atomic model you prefer, slows down as speeds increase, and the answer reflects this reality. $\endgroup$ Jan 28, 2020 at 6:19

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