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For example I have a source that emits X-Rays, is it possible to turning them into visible light or micro waves with the same energy as it was xray (I mean, can I change the frequency or the wavelength of the wave)?

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Frequency and wavelength change with interactions with a material, for example a red crystal will change white light to red, but a lot of the energy of the beam of different wavelengths will be absorbed or reflected so the verb "convert" cannot be used.

For example I have a source that emits X-Rays, is it possible to turning them into visible light

More so for X-rays, which have high energy , and are penetrating , they can interact with matter and give off different wavelengths but mostly not in the optical or micro wave.

or micro waves with the same energy as it was xray (I mean, can I change the frequency or the wavelength of the wave)?

In general frequency cannot be changed in a controled way to use the verb "convert".

There are special cases using laser light and depending on the quantum mechanical properties of lazing where the verb convert may be used, as for example here:

A directly modulated infrared diode laser was frequency doubled in an intracavity KTP quasi-phase-matched waveguide, producing modulated laser light at 425 nm, which was subsequently employed for phase fluorometric detection of CO2 and O2 gases.

Note that a lot of energy is provided by the system which doubles the frequency, so it is just a conversion convenient for the experiment.

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Yes, you can, I.e. doubling the frequency by shining the light through a specific cristal. This is used e.g. in a green laser pointer, that uses a red light laser diode and the cristal turns it into green. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second-harmonic_generation

But I don‘t think that there exist a general mechanism to convert light frequencies which, I suspect, your answer is aiming at.

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  • $\begingroup$ Actually I want the thing exactly in my example; I want to make x-rays' wavelenghts longer and turning them into very little frequencies like microwaves, infrared or radio waves. $\endgroup$ – fissile_uranium Jan 18 at 9:23
  • $\begingroup$ @fissile_uranium I see. In the meantime I remembered that you can scale down frequencies by mixing them with waves of other frequencies. This is used in radio astronomy. This may give you a starting point to search for techniques applicable to your problem. $\endgroup$ – Hartmut Braun Jan 18 at 9:28

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