0
$\begingroup$

In late 2019, The Indian Lattice Gauge Theory Initiative, theorized the existence of exotic particles, "which can be formed through the fusion of heavy baryons, similar to the formation of nuclei of elements in the Periodic Table". It is not clear to me from their paper, https://phys.org/news/2019-10-deuteron-like-heavy-dibaryonsa-exotic-nuclei.html if they are suggesting the theoretical formation of heavy elements in a new type of periodic table similar to the proposed antimatter table or are they only suggesting a new type of exotic matter, such as dark matter?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

if they are suggesting the theoretical formation of heavy elements in a new type of periodic table similar to the proposed antimatter table or are they only suggesting a new type of exotic matter, such as dark matter?

Neither.

The existence and properties of antimatter elements is trivial theoretically. They have the same properties as normal matter.

Dark matter's properties are essentially unknown, but we expect it to be a new fundamental particle that only interacts through the gravitational and weak interactions.

What they're calculating is the properties of nuclei that are not composed entirely of neutrons and protons, but instead contain some baryons in which there are charm, strange, or bottom quarks.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Note that we've been studying nuclei with strange baryons in them since 1952. We call them hypernuclei, and they most commonly have at least one $\Lambda$ baryon (valence quark composition: $uds$). So it's not clear to me what exactly is new here. $\endgroup$ – probably_someone Jan 9 at 20:06
  • $\begingroup$ I searched the topic and it is strange that they claim a new periodic table, when lattice QCD calculations for nuclear physics do not come up with any review showing the normal periodic table can be predicted. I would think it is a work in progress. Exaggerated for publicity? $\endgroup$ – anna v Jan 11 at 5:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.