0
$\begingroup$

An $\rm{eV}$ (electron volt) is equal to a volt. So that volt it is equal to, is it based on 1 volt rms or one volt peak to peak or one volt average, or some other calculation of a volt?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ No. Just like a light year is not a year but a distance. $\endgroup$ – Pieter Jan 9 at 12:37
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe it would be useful to mention that 1 eV is literally equal to e (the electron charge) times 1 V. It follows from what the answers say, but it is not yet written explicitly in this thread. $\endgroup$ – Federico Poloni Jan 9 at 20:01
8
$\begingroup$

An eV Electron volt is equal to a volt

This cannot be, as the election volt is a unit of energy, whereas a volt is a unit of potential (energy per unit charge). However, they are closely related....

So that volt it is equal to, is it based on 1 volt rms or one volt peak to peak or one volt average, or some other calculation of a volt?

The electron volt is just the change in potential energy an election experiences when undergoing a potential difference of 1 volt. i.e. if I want to move an electron at rest to a point of 1 volt lower potential difference and have the electron stop at rest, I would need to supply it with 1 electron volt of energy to do so.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

An electron volt is not equal to a volt: an electron volt is the change in energy you get by moving a charge equal to that on an electron through a potential difference of one volt. An electron volt is a unit of energy.

You can then work backwards through the definition of a volt, which is the potential difference across a conductor such that a current of one amp dissipates one watt, through the definitions of amp (which involves the charge on an electron) & so on.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

An eV Electron volt is equal to a volt.

An electron volt does not equal a volt. The first is a unit of energy. The second is energy per coulomb of charge (electrons).

The eV is a unit of energy equal to the work required to move a single electron between two points having a potential difference of 1 volt.

A volt is energy per coulomb of charge (6.24 x 10$^{18}$ electrons) required to move the charge between two points. Units are Joules/coulomb.

1 eV = 1.602 x 10$^{-19}$ Joules.

Hope this helps.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.