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Can we ascertain the size of the electron? If it really is zero radius, then it can't be matter because it doesn't occupy space?

Definition of matter (Google): physical substance in general, as distinct from mind and spirit; (in physics) that which occupies space and possesses rest mass, especially as distinct from energy.

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    $\begingroup$ What does "the size of the electron" mean? $\endgroup$
    – WillO
    Dec 24, 2019 at 6:18
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    $\begingroup$ physics.stackexchange.com/q/453912/37364 $\endgroup$
    – mmesser314
    Dec 24, 2019 at 6:24
  • $\begingroup$ Alright, so the particles possibly have non-zero radius that are too small. Would it change science if we could know the size and shape of quantum particles? $\endgroup$
    – Karthik
    Dec 24, 2019 at 8:14
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    $\begingroup$ I have a theory about that, according to which they dó have (a Planck) size. Do you want to know the answer in this theory's light? $\endgroup$ Dec 24, 2019 at 8:37
  • $\begingroup$ Oh that would be great! $\endgroup$
    – Karthik
    Dec 24, 2019 at 8:40

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To the limits of current technology, the electron behaves as a point object with zero size.

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  • $\begingroup$ Niels, doesn't indeterminacy in a way let us think of it as having "that" size? Though variable, of course. $\endgroup$
    – Alchimista
    Dec 24, 2019 at 9:08
  • $\begingroup$ Here's how it works: you scatter electrons off of electrons in a collider and experimentally determine the "structure function" which then lets you deduce the shape and size of the electron. Those experiments indicate that the electron is symmetrical and that if it has a size, it must be smaller than about 10^18 centimeters. $\endgroup$ Dec 24, 2019 at 19:14
  • $\begingroup$ That is what I mean. Technology or theoretically I would say it does not behave as a point object. Though I can imagine that its size can be treated as to be zero in most cases. But certainly not in H. Of course in terms of a wave function, not that I see it like a small rigid ball. $\endgroup$
    – Alchimista
    Dec 25, 2019 at 7:36

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