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theoretically if an object is kept in a non inertial frame then it should move due to the pseudo force acting on it yet I have seen examples where on a frictionless plane objects dont seem to move relative to the frame in which they are kept, i'm a beginner please clarify my doubts and misconceptions
Thanks and Regards

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    $\begingroup$ Can you give some of these examples, so that we have a better idea of what you are asking about? $\endgroup$ – Clara Diaz Sanchez Dec 13 '19 at 16:51
  • $\begingroup$ Are these examples on a non-inertial frictionless inclined plane? $\endgroup$ – JMac Dec 13 '19 at 16:52
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I have seen examples where on a frictionless plane objects dont seem to move relative to the frame in which they are kept

The examples you are referring to probably involve objects on frictionless inclined planes of, say, a wedge, where the wedge is on a horizontal surface and undergoing horizontal acceleration.

If the component of the horizontal acceleration of the wedge acting parallel and down the incline equals the downward acceleration that the object would have experienced if the wedge was a rest, then there will be no relative motion between the object and the wedge as viewed in the non inertial reference frame of the wedge, as well as in the inertial reference frame of the supporting surface.

See the following link Newton’s second law - a uniform massive rope on a wedge where this is explained in the case of a massive rope on an incline plane using free body diagrams.

Hope this helps.

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