0
$\begingroup$

I am a physics undergraduate and I would be glad if you share your opinion about which books are best for which topics in mathematical methods, from very basic to advanced. (Like you some say Tom Apostol is good for calculus or Riley Hobson is good for vector calculus(just sayin'))

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Mathematical physics text with plenty of applications $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Nov 29 '19 at 12:53
  • $\begingroup$ Probably other similar queries, if you look in the sidebar to the above & this post $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Nov 29 '19 at 12:54
  • $\begingroup$ @KyleKanos You misinterpreted my question! What I am asking is which book is best for which topic, not a single book for everything or a book which also shows the application of the math. Thank you! $\endgroup$ – Saptarshi sarma Nov 30 '19 at 13:11
  • $\begingroup$ Then you want physics.stackexchange.com/q/12175/25301, but this ask of yours is excessively broad for this Q&A format. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Nov 30 '19 at 13:40
0
$\begingroup$

A textbook with a wide variety of explanations and exercises and that has provided me with all the new maths I was unfamiliar with as an undergraduate would be ‘Mathematical Techniques’ by Jordan and Smith. It does apply the mathematics to physicist perspective in an informative way, with very little jargon.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ What I am asking is which book is best for which topic, not a single book for everything or a book which also shows the application of the math. $\endgroup$ – Saptarshi sarma Nov 30 '19 at 13:13

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.