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Keep your eyes near 0V anode potential - here you can see that the light with maximum frequency has more photoelectric current and that the light with minimum frequency has less photoelectric current but how is it possible?

When we have two different frequencies of light $\nu_1$ and $\nu_2$ ($\nu_2>\nu_1$) and having same intensity of light then number of photons per unit time per unit area decrease for 2nd and increase for 1st.. Which means photoelectric current must have a low value for 2nd and a high value for 1st - Which is the opposite of the graph.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Please don’t take screenshots of texts, just write the words directly into the post (though if it’s the image you want, please edit the image so the text is cropped out). You should also attribute the works to a particular author & book title. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Nov 28 '19 at 14:17
  • $\begingroup$ Ok i have done it $\endgroup$ – Torsional constant Nov 28 '19 at 14:25
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The photoelectric current depends in complicated ways on frequency. The figure is wrong for real photocathodes.

But the idea is probably that this is a theoretical material with a quantum yield of 100 % for all frequencies above the threshold, and that the different curves are for the same photon flux.

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