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This question is somewhat related to the these questions:-Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields? and Gauss's law for induced electric and magnetic field

But my question is somewhat different from the above.If a system of charges enclosed in gaussian surface is accelerated then can we accelerate our gaussian surface in same direction to make Gauss's law valid for accelerating charges as well.Is it true or completely nonsense?Does electric flux depends upon the motion of gaussian surface relative to charge enclosed?

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  • $\begingroup$ The Gaussian surface is just a mathematical surface. So when you ask can we accelerate the Gaussian surface along with the charges what you really are asking is just is Gauss's law valid for a time dependent field at any instant in time, as the validity cannot depend on which surface you choose to use. Therefore what you are looking for has already been covered in the questions you have linked to. $\endgroup$ – Aaron Stevens Nov 14 '19 at 15:59
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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields? $\endgroup$ – Aaron Stevens Nov 14 '19 at 16:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Aaron Stevens Hello sir,sorry for contradiction but if I say that electric field is also just a mathematical description but it also moves in space $\endgroup$ – RunMachine_Kohli Nov 14 '19 at 16:51
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A Gaussian surface is not a physical object, so it doesn't have a state of motion. It's a spatial surface that exists at one moment in time. Gauss's law doesn't talk about time at all -- it's a constraint on electric field patterns at any given time. Gauss's law is valid for accelerating charges.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello sir,sorry for contradiction but if I say that electric field is also just a mathematical description but it also moves in space $\endgroup$ – RunMachine_Kohli Nov 14 '19 at 16:50
  • $\begingroup$ @Shreyansh: Not true. Electric fields aren't described as moving in space. $\endgroup$ – Ben Crowell Nov 14 '19 at 16:54
  • $\begingroup$ In electromagnetic waves I think $\endgroup$ – RunMachine_Kohli Nov 14 '19 at 17:04
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    $\begingroup$ @Shreyansh Even with waves that is not the case. You are probably thinking of picking a certain field value and then tracing out a path in space where the field is that set value over time. But that is not the field moving in space. The field is defined at all points in space at all time. This is not the case for your proposed Gaussian surface. $\endgroup$ – Aaron Stevens Nov 14 '19 at 17:17

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