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I have read that kirchoff first and second rule is in accordance to law of conservation of charge and energy respectively.But I cannot relate how it does justify.KCL just states that incoming current is equal to outgoing current it talks nothing about creation or destruction of charge i.e its conservation.Similarly KVL just states that energy gained due to emf is lost in resistor but it does not tall about its conservation? I know somewhere I am missing something.Can someone elaborate and make me clear how the initial statements are true.

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But I cannot relate how it does justify.KCL just states that incoming current is equal to outgoing current it talks nothing about creation or destruction of charge i.e its conservation.

Kirchhoff's Current Law, KCL, essentially says the algebraic sum of the currents flowing into a node is zero. This is because charge entering a node has no place to go except to leave the node. If more charge leaves a node than enters a node, charge would be somehow "lost" at the node, violating the law of conservation of charge. Likewise, if less charge leaves a node than enters a node charge would somehow be "created" at a node, again in violation of the law of conservation of charge.

Similarly KVL just states that energy gained due to emf is lost in resistor but it does not talk about its conservation?

A voltage source gives charge electrical potential energy. Kirchhoff's Voltage Law, KVL, essentially says the algebraic sum of the voltages around a circuit loop is zero. This means the electrical potential energy given the charge by a voltage source has to equal the sum of the voltage drops (losses of electrical potential energy of the charge) around the loop. These losses of electrical potential energy have to be accounted for.

The lost potential energy of the charge can be either stored in the electric and magnetic fields of capacitance and inductance, respectively, in the circuit, or dissipated as heat in resistance in the circuit. The sum of the energy stored and dissipated in the circuit has to equal the energy supplied by the source to satisfy the law of conservation of energy.

Hope this helps.

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