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Does the launching of a satellite need the consideration of the general theory of relativity (GR)?

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Newtonian physics would be sufficient to launch and orbit a satellite. But any equipment, sensors, or experiments on board that required exact timing might need to take into account relativistic time dilations from speed and gravity.

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  • $\begingroup$ But the general theory isn't used right? $\endgroup$ – Ahitagni Oct 27 '19 at 13:03
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    $\begingroup$ General relativity is the “gravity” part of this answer. Without corrections from GR, GPS systems wouldn’t function properly. $\endgroup$ – Bob Knighton Oct 27 '19 at 13:04
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    $\begingroup$ @Ahitagni GR's effect is approximately $-2$ times SR's effect, so if you neglect GR you get a sign error. $\endgroup$ – J.G. Oct 28 '19 at 10:46
  • $\begingroup$ So GR is considered right.... thankyou to all of you....thanks for the help guys... you-all are the best $\endgroup$ – Ahitagni Oct 28 '19 at 10:48
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    $\begingroup$ @origimbo The sentence makes more sense as "So GR is considered, right". The OP omitted the comma in the first comment, too. $\endgroup$ – JollyJoker Oct 28 '19 at 12:09
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No. Newtonian gravity is sufficient.

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