0
$\begingroup$

When I did an experiment measuring the Resistance of a thermistor as I increase or decrease the temperature, when I plot the resistance (y - axis) against temperature (x-axis), I get an exponential decay curve. I know for sure that thermistors have an inverse relationship with temperature and resistance, however I do not know why my graph or experiments shows an exponential decay. Are there any mathematical relationship between resistance and temperature of a thermistor, or previous studies conducted showing the relationship?

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ How do you know your curve is an exponential decay and not an inverse temperature decay? What uncertainty analysis did you do to verify this? $\endgroup$ Oct 30, 2021 at 18:53

1 Answer 1

0
$\begingroup$

The resistance of a thermistor changes with temperature. How much the resistance changes depends on the type of material used in the thermistor.

Unlike other sensors, thermistors are nonlinear, meaning the points on a graph representing the relationship between resistance and temperature will not form a straight line. The location of the line and how much it changes is determined by the construction of the thermistor.

Refer: https://www.teamwavelength.com/thermistor-basics/

$\endgroup$
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.