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I don't have a background in physics. However I wanted to ask a question relevant to the Chernobyl disaster. From what I found online the helicopter that tried to release sand to shut down the fire over the nuclear core.

"...due to the height and the amount of radiation coming from the core remains the crane operators would have received lethal does before any crane movements could be done along with the electronics of said cranes fried to a crisp from the radiation." (https://www.quora.com/Why-did-the-helicopter-crash-in-Chernobyl-while-covering-the-exposed-nuclear-core)

My question is:

Is it because it was over the nuclear core? or could this had happened in another contaminated area?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Ben Crowell, Gert, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer Oct 16 at 23:46

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The helicopter struck the bucket cable on a nearby crane with its main rotor blades, shearing all of them off in an instant. It then fell to earth. This had nothing to do with the radiation present at the time of the accident.

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It was due to the core. Could some of the core have been moved to another close-by area due to the explosion? I'd say it may have been. But the article refers to the radiation from the core. That would be where it is most intense.

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  • $\begingroup$ thank you for your answer $\endgroup$ – Loizos Vasileiou Oct 15 at 19:30

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