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Some (the claimed) frequencies of our body

Here are what are claimed frequency can be used to heal our (certain part of) body. In my opinion, they work if the "transmitting" frequencies are meet with the receiving frequency in our body. I have heard a professor of physic of MIT, Prof. Walter Lewin, explains that our heart acting like tiny alternating current battery, which alternating between inner of the heart and the outer (atrium and ventricle). That alternation makes our heart just like dipole antenna with frequency is our heart beating (around 74Hz). I never heard any other something like transmitting and receiving signal in our body. If so, so what are the claimed such these frequencies so they are claimed can heal our illness? Which part of our body are they? I am not asking for detail, just asking the name of the part of the body.

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  • $\begingroup$ I can not tell you 100% if there is merit to these methods or not, but I do have a MsC in electromagnetic field theory and i can give you my OPINION on the topic. If you ask me there is no merit to these methods. If they were real they would be a bigger deal in medicine. These are pseudo-medicine used by tree-huggers and hipsters. Then again, this is my opinion, if you find a source that says otherwise (credible source, not youtube), please share it with me $\endgroup$
    – DakkVader
    Oct 15 '19 at 6:28
  • $\begingroup$ That also the answer, at least I know that the claim are fake, and will ensure many people that no need to believe to the claims. $\endgroup$
    – Sitorus
    Oct 15 '19 at 18:40
  • $\begingroup$ @DakkVader I find the "tree-huggers and hipsters" comment unnecessary. A person could be quite scientifically oriented and still fall under either of those generalizations. And there is nothing inherently unscientific about those groups, however you define them. $\endgroup$ Oct 15 '19 at 22:28
  • $\begingroup$ @electronpusher It may have been unessecary and been written in a heated moment, i understand your criticism. $\endgroup$
    – DakkVader
    Oct 16 '19 at 6:54
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The claims you've linked to have no support within modern science, and they never have. Those frequencies are not "received" by any specific part of the human body, and there is not a shred of evidence that they will have any health effects above those of a placebo.

If you don't believe this, go ask them to point you to the clinical literature (controlled, randomized clinical trials) that supports their claims. This site is for physics, and the claims you've linked to have nothing to do with science.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your explanation. At least now I am sure that the claim are fake. $\endgroup$
    – Sitorus
    Oct 15 '19 at 18:41

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