0
$\begingroup$

I've seen many videos where magnets are used to initiate and boost RPMs. Most of them are fake, where people are using compressed air at the backstage.

Did anyone of you actually tried to challenge following hypothesis. Is is possible to setup magnetic fields and its forces in a way to generate enough thrust from drone engines, and to lift from the surface?

What are the best practices to achieve at least 40.000 RPM? One of the biggest challege in aerospace industry when it comes to propulsion is weight, obviously. While we have quite powerfull and light, neodymium magnets, are you aware of any more efficient magnets for such kind of project?

Let's take a look on magnetic levitation to generate motion. Imagine a ring within radius of spinning blades which have two layers, where magnetic shifts from possitive and negative affecting the blade. Take a look on below image.

enter image description here

enter image description here

I would like to ask you for your advice, how to get higher rotation and what materials would be the best choice for it.

Your opinion is more than appreciated!

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ “ Is is possible to setup magnetic fields and its forces in a way to generate enough thrust from drone engines, and to lift from the surface?” Yes, that is what an electric motor does and you can buy this sort of drone as an inexpensive toy. Since I assume you mean something else, can you please reword your question? $\endgroup$ – Dale Oct 12 at 14:24
0
$\begingroup$

Your proposal is a type of perpetual motion device which is popularly referred to as a "magnetic motor" (NOT an "electric motor", which is a real thing). Every one of these magnetic motors is impossible because they all presuppose that it is in some way possible to have one permanent magnet "sneak up" on another and then suddenly experience repulsion. The structure of magnetic fields does not permit this, no matter how clever you might think you are in assembling the magnets into the wheels and whatnot of the device.

Electric motors do not suffer from this problem, because the magnetic fields in them are generated by electromagnetic coils which can be switched on and off as the armature inside the motor revolves.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.