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Suppose there was a small vacuum chamber filled with water, would the water, having no pressure upon it, vaporize? And if so, would the vapor rise like it would when boiling a kettle, or would do something else? Further so, would there be a way to collect the water vapor and condense it?

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Vacuum is not the same as zero gravity. So if bubbles rise in a kettle they will rise in a vacuum chamber.

The pressure will eventually be the saturation pressure of water at the temperature of the environment (about 0.02 bar at room temperature).

Yes, the vapor can be condensed again, by reducing the volume.

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  • $\begingroup$ Pieter, you also have to remove the heat of vaporization from the water to condense it. $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 5, 2019 at 12:50

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