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I am completely new in this field, so please pardon me if I am asking something which makes no sense at all :)

The Situation: According to Einstein's theory of relativity, there is a 4th dimension out in space where all the planets of our solar system keeps on sliding in that space-time fabric due to the curvature produced by the enormous masses of the celestial bodies. So does Uranus, and all its moons. If I'm not wrong Uranus has a tilted axis and it's moons revolve around this planet along its equator, but in a vertical way, unlike the case in the other planets where the moons rotate along the equator horizontally.

The Question: How is the space-time fabric curved around Uranus? Is it tilted too?
If not, how do the moons around Uranus tend to rotate?
If yes, then what is the cause of that tilt?

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  • $\begingroup$ How is the space-time fabric curved around Uranus? Is it tilted too? If not, how do the moons around Uranus tend to rotate? If yes, then what is the cause of that tilt? I would like to say that you must to try to formulate a single question every time that you propose to write something beyond the chat chat.stackexchange.com/… $\endgroup$ – M.N.Raia Sep 29 '19 at 16:53
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The fourth dimension is time. It isn’t “out in space”; it’s everywhere and you are moving through it right now. Four-dimensional spacetime is curved in a four-dimensional way, but it isn’t really like a two-dimensional fabric; that’s just a popsci metaphor. So there no fabric to tilt around Uranus, but there is curved spacetime around Uranus.

Except for a small effect due to Uranus’ rotation, the spacetime curvature around it (and any other planet) is radially symmetric. Any tilt of its lunar plane is an accident of how the planet and its moons formed, or of how Uranus got captured by our solar system, or of some subsequent collision. The radially symmetric gravity due to the curvature would allow the moons to move just as easily in any other plane.

For example, we can put satellites in equatorial orbits, tilted orbits, or polar orbits around the Earth.

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