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This question already has an answer here:

As a neutrally charged particle, a photon shouldn't interact electrically with another charged particle. However, since photons are electromagnetic waves, they should interact with charged particles, both electrically and magnetically.

Is this because the average in time of the electric and magnetic fields is zero?

(physics student)

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marked as duplicate by PM 2Ring, Thomas Fritsch, rob Sep 14 at 14:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Yes photons have electric and magnetic fields. Like terahertz can be used to measure carrier lifetime in some materials, which can avoid the damage from attaching electrical devices to them.

https://dspace.mit.edu/bitstream/handle/1721.1/102134/Transient%20Terahertz.pdf;sequence=1

And this is how radio works

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio

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No, as you also said that photons are neutral particles due to this property, no charge will be interact with Photons because the rest mass and charge is zero and also they don't have any magnetic poles.

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