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It is well known that light has a dual nature. However, the energy and momentum conservation equations embody the wave aspect of light but not the material aspect of the photon. Should there be additional terms reflecting this aspect of the photon as in the photoelectric and Compton effect?

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    $\begingroup$ What do you consider to be “the energy and momentum conservation equations”? $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Sep 12 at 17:35
  • $\begingroup$ Are you sure you are not looking at the Maxwellian versions of these equations before we knew light had momentum? Certainly this is accounted for in QM, it is the original impetus for it! $\endgroup$ – Maury Markowitz Sep 12 at 18:13
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    $\begingroup$ @maury Classical electromagnet waves carry momentum; a thing well known in the late 19th century. $\endgroup$ – dmckee Sep 12 at 19:33
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Classical electromagentic waves and photons are two ways of modeling the same phenomena. The momentum carried by a beam of light is not "wave momentum" plus "particle momentum", it's just the one momentum that can be described either way.

For certain observable phenomena it is clearer to chose one description than the other, but this is a choice of how to describe the thing not a selection of a subset.

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