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As we all know that for a static fluid, pressure increases as we go down from its free surface. What about fluid in motion? Suppose I eject a jet of water in the air, parallel to the surface of the earth(assumed to be perfectly flat). Neglect the bending of water jet in the vertical direction as it flows in the flat direction. I am interested to know the variation of pressure along y direction. Is it same as that for a static fluid? Or something different? If someone can give me some hint or solve the problem explicitly it wolud be of much help.

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  • $\begingroup$ It is atmospheric pressure. You can't neglect the bending of the water jet because the downward acceleration balances the gravitational force, so that the jet is essentially in free fall. $\endgroup$ – Chet Miller Sep 9 '19 at 13:39
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Water in free fall has no pressure of it's own(neglecting air resistance). It takes the force of gravity pressing the water down against a "bottom" to create greater pressure with depth. Accelerating a glass of water upward will increase the pressure at the bottom, accelerating it downward will lower the pressure, just as we feel heavier or lighter on an accelerating elevator.

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