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I know that satellites can go in polar orbits, but as far as I have read, this is only done by LEO satellites. I think it is possible to have geosynchronous satellites with polar orbits (near polar), but how feasible is it? I'm wrong?

PD: English is not my native language

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Geo synchronous, yes. Geo stationary, No.

"Geosynchronous" means that the orbital period is the same as Earth's rotational period. "Geostationary" means that the satellite always stays directly above the same spot on Earth's surface. You can have a geosynchronous orbit in any plane and with any eccentricity, but a geostationary orbit is only possible if the orbit is circular, and in the plane of the Earth's equator.

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To add to what Solomon Slow said, the only way to have a geostationary orbit is if you orbit the Earth at exactly the speed that it rotates, so that you "float" about a single point on the surface. Since the Earth rotates on its axis, this is not possible if you are orbiting on a plane perpendicular to the plane of rotation (a polar orbit).

As you said, you can have a geosynchronous orbit, so that as you orbit around the poles, you'll be flying above the same exact points at the same times each day.

You cannot orbit so that you're just indefinitely "floating" above, say, the North pole.

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