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This question already has an answer here:

This might be a very stupid question for Science students, but I had this doubt always, since childhood. I still don't understand even when I'm adult because I didn't read science in detail.

When I would ask the same question from my teachers, first my classmates and teachers would laugh. Then he would reply:

This has no answer. Why is a man a man?

I felt bad.

Now, I do feel like it has something to do with Photons. But since I don't know much Physics, and I'm not in touch with it, I can't understand it.

Is there any basic way to help me understand this?

Like I can feel that light can enter from anything which has pores.

I can understand that air can't flow through glass.

But I just can't feel/understand how light can pass through it.

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marked as duplicate by John Rennie visible-light Aug 27 at 16:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Why is glass transparent? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Aug 27 at 16:31
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    $\begingroup$ Notice that the student who asked the "duplicate" question had the same problem: Mocked by a teacher for asking a question that the teacher did not know how to answer. It happens more often than you might think. Don't take it personally. If you ask a question that your teacher can't answer, then it probably is an interesting question. (Note the 90 upvotes on the "duplicate".) $\endgroup$ – Solomon Slow Aug 27 at 17:13
  • $\begingroup$ Vikas, teachers shouldn't laugh ... they should look for the reason that the question was asked. And note - it's not that glass is transparent. People deliberately looked for a transparent material to put in their windows so they could see outside. In all of nature, surely there are some materials that are transparent to visible light, and glass is one of them. But I'm sure that you want to know why ANY material is transparent to visible light. Hopefully, the link provided by John Rennie will answer that question for you. $\endgroup$ – David White Aug 27 at 17:59
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidWhite I guess no. My question would be why ANY material would allow visible light to pass throught it, even when there are no pores. $\endgroup$ – Vikas Aug 28 at 2:45